Stigmatising ‘super-spreaders’ won’t help the fight against coronavirus | Philip Ball

The idea that people who infect a large number of others are ‘culprits’ is scientifically flawed – and deeply unfair

Few people believe any longer that illness is divine punishment for sin. But if you want to see signs that health is still considered today a moral affair, take a look at how we respond to epidemics like the coronavirus.

The Brighton businessman identified as a “super-spreader” of the virus after he contracted it at a conference in Singapore is reported by the Times as feeling “very harassed” and “scared that [he’ll] become a scapegoat”. He is thought to have infected at least 11 people while traveling and socialising, before developing (mild) symptoms himself. It’s hard not to read the media emphasis on his role as a scout leader as an implication that he has carelessly endangered innocent children.

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Source: The Guardian
Stigmatising ‘super-spreaders’ won’t help the fight against coronavirus | Philip Ball